Mount Vernon News
 
 
Ryan Tarr, 12, shows off the rainbow trout he caught in the pond at Campbell’s Range during Saturday’s Pheasants Forever Youth Field Day.
Ryan Tarr, 12, shows off the rainbow trout he caught in the pond at Campbell’s Range during Saturday’s Pheasants Forever Youth Field Day. (Photo by Alan Reed)

By Mount Vernon News
April 23, 2012 11:26 am EDT

 

HOWARD — Getting connected with the outdoors, working on outdoor projects, learning new skills — and having fun.

This was all on tap for the many youngsters who visited the fourth annual Knox County Pheasants Forever Youth Field Day on April 21 at Campbell’s Range near Howard. It was a wet and chilly day, but that didn’t stop the many eager 3- to 17-year-olds who came out to enjoy the many activities prepared for the day.

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“Four years ago, there was a study that determined that children were spending six to six and one-half hours per day involved with electronic gadgets,” said event coordinator and Pheasants Forever secretary Althea Dye. “Funding for many school programs being cut has contributed to this problem. So we developed this program with the goal of ‘No Child Left Indoors.’”

A total of 80 youngsters had registered before Saturday’s events began. Dye was expecting to have about 200 participate by day’s end.

Numerous educational stations were set up where the participants could build a birdhouse, create their own hummingbird feeder, perform leather crafting, learn about fur pelts, pan for gold or take part in a variety of sporting activities. Throughout the day, children were seen shooting shotguns and rifles, throwing tomahawks at a target, shooting a bow and arrow, fishing in a pond, learning new skills and crafts and just enjoying being in the outdoors. Carson Davis and Hunter Davis learned how to make a hummingbird feeder; Megan Randall was seen crafting a leather rounder; Trey Carter was making an arrowhead necklace for himself; Coby Moore was trying his hand at the tomahawk toss; Damien Griswold was shooting clay pigeons with a shotgun; and Sandi and Staci Brenneman were learning how to shoot a bow and arrow.

Learning all about a Northern Copperhead was Matthew Salvucci of Newark.

“It felt kind of rocky,” said Salvucci when he was given the opportunity to pet the snake, loaned to the event by the Brown Family Environmental Center.

For the full story, click here for the April 23, 2012 e-edition. The article will only be available for thirty (30) days.

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