Mount Vernon News
 
 
Special award winners during Friday’s Knox County Distinguished Young Women Scholarship program include, first row, from left, Renae Secrest, Spirit Award; Alayna Durbin, Spirit Award; and Ann Wolford, Spirit Award. Second row, from left, are Morgan Brass, Central Knox County Be Your Best Self; Riley Miller, Central Knox County Community Service and Spirit Award; Olivia Buckingham, Greater Knox County Community Service; and Malary Shira, Greater Knox County Be Your Best Self.
Special award winners during Friday’s Knox County Distinguished Young Women Scholarship program include, first row, from left, Renae Secrest, Spirit Award; Alayna Durbin, Spirit Award; and Ann Wolford, Spirit Award. Second row, from left, are Morgan Brass, Central Knox County Be Your Best Self; Riley Miller, Central Knox County Community Service and Spirit Award; Olivia Buckingham, Greater Knox County Community Service; and Malary Shira, Greater Knox County Be Your Best Self. (Photo by Virgil Shipley) View Image

By Mount Vernon News
November 17, 2012 2:55 am EST

 

MOUNT VERNON —The 49th annual Distinguished Young Women of Knox County program took the stage Friday night at Memorial Theater as 20 Knox County seniors competed in five categories of judging.

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Opening night culminated with the announcement of the winners of the Community Service, Be your Best Self, and Spirit awards. Community Service Award was presented to Riley Miller, Central Knox County, and Olivia Buckingham, Greater Knox County. Miller was also presented with a Spirit Award as well as Renae Secret, Alayna Durbin and Ann Wolford. The Be Your Best Self Awards were presented to Morgan Brass, Central Knox County, and Malary Shira, Greater Knox County.

Emcees Joe and Marcy Rinehart kept the program moving with assistance from Kathryn Hebenthal, 2012 Greater Knox County Junior Miss, and 2012 Central Knox County Junior Miss Lauren Butterfield. A panel of five judges reviewed the young women’s participation in their interviews, scholastic performances, talent, fitness and self-expression.

Their interviews and scholastic reviews are not part of the stage routines viewed by the audience. The interviews, which contribute 25 percent of the score, evaluate values, clarity of expression and human relations. The scholastic section, which accounts for 20 percent of the total score, includes school transcripts, test scores, class rank and college entrance exams.

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