Mount Vernon News
 
 
Sightseers examine the high waters in the Kokosing River during the 1913 flood from the dubious safety of the South Main Street viaduct.
Sightseers examine the high waters in the Kokosing River during the 1913 flood from the dubious safety of the South Main Street viaduct. (Photo by ) View Image

By Mount Vernon News
March 28, 2013 11:31 am EDT

 

MOUNT VERNON — The rain kept falling and falling until finally, two days after Easter in 1913, the Kokosing River and its tributaries left their banks, flooding the west and south sides of Mount Vernon. From around the county came reports of bridges washed away or damaged, levees being breached or overtopped, villages inundated and houses washed away.

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From Lake Erie to the Ohio River, every stream in Ohio, and most of them in Indiana, left their banks. The Miami, Scioto and Muskingum valleys were all hit hard.

On Friday, March 21, 1913, the Mount Vernon Daily Banner reported on wind damage in the city and county. Telephone lines being down was the biggest headache and damage was assessed at “several hundred dollars.”

On Saturday, March 22, 1913, the Daily Banner reported storms sweeping the South and West. Tornadoes were reported from Texas to New York and more than 100 people were reported killed.

In Newark, 3,600 square feet of a factory roof was torn off by high winds, and in Columbus a man was killed when the wall of a factory that was being dismantled fell over.

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