Mount Vernon News
 
 
  • Panelists discuss the legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen, whose remarkable record helped end racial segregation in the U.S. military, Wednesday afternoon at Kenyon College. From left are Kenyon student Lydia Winkler, whose research on the Airmen led to the program; Donald Elder, who served as a crew chief with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group; Edward Morast, an Air Force veteran who is president of the Ohio Memorial Chapter of Tuskegee Airmen Inc., Stanley Lee Landrum, another Air Force veteran and member of Tuskegee Airmen Inc., and Harold Wesley, a gunner on a B-24 heavy bomber, who was on missions escorted by the Tuskegee Airmen in World War II. style=

    Tuskegee Airmen made history in two wars

    Panelists discuss the legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen, whose remarkable record helped end racial segregation in the U.S. military, Wednesday afternoon at Kenyon College. From left are Kenyon student Lydia Winkler, whose research on the Airmen led to the program; Donald Elder, who served as a crew chief with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group; Edward Morast, an Air Force veteran who is president of the Ohio Memorial Chapter of Tuskegee Airmen Inc., Stanley Lee Landrum, another Air Force veteran and member of Tuskegee Airmen Inc., and Harold Wesley, a gunner on a B-24 heavy bomber, who was on missions escorted by the Tuskegee Airmen in World War II. (Photo by Virgil Shipley)

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