Mount Vernon News
 
 
Anika Kanuckel-Wolfe, left, and Kirsten Hunter represented Mount Vernon Middle School in the National History Day in Ohio competition.
Anika Kanuckel-Wolfe, left, and Kirsten Hunter represented Mount Vernon Middle School in the National History Day in Ohio competition. (Photo by Pamela Schehl)
Mount Vernon News
May 8, 2013 11:38 am EDT

 

MOUNT VERNON — Sponsored by the Ohio Historical Society, National History Day in Ohio is a co-curricular program for students in grades four through 12. Students conduct research based on the annual theme and create historical papers, original performances, documentaries, creative exhibits and imaginative websites as a result of their research. This year’s theme was “Turning Points in History: People, Ideas, Events.”

Advertisement

LJJA Martial Arts

 

Victoria Wendt and Jacob Miller represented Mount Vernon High School in the state event held April 27, and Kirsten Hunter and Anika Kanuckel-Wolfe represented the middle school.

Hunter said the experience at the state History Day was pretty scary. “I was really nervous about it,” she said, “but it was a lot of fun.”

Hunter’s exhibit featured facts about the international moratorium on whaling. “I like whales,” she said, “and I decided to look into it more. I found out Japan, Iceland and Norway are still whaling, even though there is a ban against it. They say it is part of their culture.”

Hunter said she enjoyed the fact that the state judges stretched her brain a little bit. “Some of the questions kind of made me go deeper into what I was doing,” she explained.

Kanuckel-Wolfe also thought the state event was a little scary, but, “It was really fun,” she said. Her performance highlighted American Band Stand. She said the program was significant in history because teenagers all over the world were affected by it.

Miller’s essay discussed how Lyndon Johnson’s landslide victory over Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential race brought national attention to the conservative movement in the Republican Party and, in effect, made them more respectable.

Wendt’s research paper was about women in the U.S. Naval Academy and the challenges they face today as well as when women were first admitted to the traditionally all-male institution. She earned an honorable mention for her efforts.


Rules: Please keep your comments smart and civil. Don’t attack other commenters personally and keep your language decent. If a comment violates our comments standards, click the “X” in the upper right corner of the comment box to report abuse. To post comments, you must be a Facebook member.
Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.