Mount Vernon News
 
 
The Knox County Commissioners toured four agricultural drainage ditches on Monday afternoon in an annual review to determine their effectiveness. Pictured are, from left, county commissioners Thom Collier and Roger Reed, Knox SWCD Director Rob Clendening, Knox County Engineer Jim Henry, commissioner Teresa Bemiller (obstructed) and engineer in training Clint Cochran.
The Knox County Commissioners toured four agricultural drainage ditches on Monday afternoon in an annual review to determine their effectiveness. Pictured are, from left, county commissioners Thom Collier and Roger Reed, Knox SWCD Director Rob Clendening, Knox County Engineer Jim Henry, commissioner Teresa Bemiller (obstructed) and engineer in training Clint Cochran. (Photo by Alan Reed) View Image

By Mount Vernon News
June 25, 2013 12:20 pm EDT

 

MOUNT VERNON — A tour of four agricultural ditches was on tap for the Knox County Commissioners on Monday afternoon. This annual tour is conducted with Rob Clendening of the Knox Soil & Water Conservation District and Knox County Engineer Jim Henry to review the condition of these ditches and determine their ongoing effectiveness.

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Ralphie’s Ditch, located on Barnes Road in southwest Hilliar Township, was constructed in 1980 for improved agricultural drainage. This ditch is 2,175 feet long and drains 276 acres. Most of this land was agricultural when built, but residential development has since moved in.

Located in eastern Hilliar Township is the North Branch Ford Creek Ditch, near Krause Road. This was built in 1997 and is 8,000 feet long, serving 1,425 acres. It, too, has seen increased development pressure and conversion to rural homesites. Clendening said that it currently contains a bit more reed canary grass than is ideal.

Also in eastern Hilliar Township is Sycamore Meadows Ditch near Ohio 567 and Sycamore Road. This was constructed in 2005, is 1,580 feet long and drains 220 acres, primarily for drainage from the rural housing development Sycamore Meadows. It also serves as a conveyance for “pass-through” agricultural drainage, which comes from properties located above the ditch.

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